News

At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

The “NY Quadrille” format reconfigures the Joyce Theater by turning auditorium and stage inside out. The square stage becomes the theater’s centerpiece: The audience is on both sides, as at a tennis or snooker match.

One side of the stage leads straight to a rising slope of tiered seating, with a proximity the Joyce usually lacks. But the other side ends with a sharp drop. Dancers on that side look as exposed as if on a cliff’s edge, with a gap between them and the seats.

Everything about this is so refreshing that I wish it happened more often. In 2016, when the “NY Quadrille” had its first iteration, four companies appeared in a two-week season. This year, five troupes will contribute over three weeks. The idea came from the choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who has curated both seasons.


Read More: At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

The “NY Quadrille” format reconfigures the Joyce Theater by turning auditorium and stage inside out. The square stage becomes the theater’s centerpiece: The audience is on both sides, as at a tennis or snooker match.

One side of the stage leads straight to a rising slope of tiered seating, with a proximity the Joyce usually lacks. But the other side ends with a sharp drop. Dancers on that side look as exposed as if on a cliff’s edge, with a gap between them and the seats.

Everything about this is so refreshing that I wish it happened more often. In 2016, when the “NY Quadrille” had its first iteration, four companies appeared in a two-week season. This year, five troupes will contribute over three weeks. The idea came from the choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who has curated both seasons.


Read More: At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

Fall Dance Preview: From Ballet to Bach

One of J.S. Bach’s most iconic works, the Brandenburg Concertos, will be presented as a dance at the Park Avenue Armory this fall. It is one of several new works of dance to be presented throughout New York City starting this month.

WNYC’s dance critic Marina Harss spoke to Richard Hake about the upcoming season. She highlighted this North American premiere set to the music of Bach created by Belgian choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker.

"She’s a modern dance choreographer with a strong influence of minimalism," Harss told Hake. "She’s really interested in the structures underlying the music. What she sort of does is break apart all the layers, and Bach has many layers."

Harss also discussed the dances of Kyle Abraham who is presenting his first-ever work for New York City Ballet. It will debut as part of the ballet’s Fall Gala on Sept. 27.

Abraham’s company, A.I.M., will also be on stage at the Joyce Theater as part of its three-week, dance festival
Read More: Fall Dance Preview: From Ballet to Bach

Meet the first Filipina winner of 'So You Think You Can Dance'

UCI Dance student Hannahlei Cabanilla’s audition piece alone got the “So You Think You Can Dance” judges on their feet to welcome her with a golden ticket to the academy, including Fil-Am celebrity judge Vanessa Hudgens.

Her victory is one for the books.

Hannahlei is the first Filipino-American to win the $250,000 prize as the grand winner of this season of “So You Think You Can Dance.”

“Every step of the journey is very humbling, and it’s so amazing that I’ve had an impact on so many people’s lives, and I’m representing dancers, Filipinos, just everyone’s that is supporting me.”

Her message for those who dream of becoming the next dance show winner is to put in the work.

“I just wanna inspire them and show that anyone could do this if you just put in the effort and time and work, because I was one of those little girls looking up to all the past winners, knowing that I wanted to be on this show…and now I’m in the winner’s shoes.

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Read More: Meet the first Filipina winner of 'So You Think You Can Dance'

The ‘So You Think You Can Dance Winner’ is …

After weeks of grueling auditions and dazzling performances, Season 15 of “So You Think You Can Dance” finally crowned a winner Monday night during a jam-packed two-hour finale on Fox.

And it was Hannahlei Cabanilla, an 18-year-old contemporary dancer from Anaheim Hills, Ca., who captured top honors. She edged out Jensen Arnold, a 20-year-old Latin ballroom specialist from Provo, Utah.

Read more at www.mercurynews.com


Read More: The ‘So You Think You Can Dance Winner’ is …

Hannahlei Cabanilla wins ‘So You Think You Can Dance’

Hannahlei Cabanilla is America’s favorite dancer.

During the Season 15 finale of the Fox series “So You Think You Can Dance,” the 18-year-old Anaheim Hills native was named the winner.

“It was the best moment of my life,” she said facing a line of reporters following the show on Monday, Sept. 10.

Cabanilla is Orange County’s second-consecutive winner. She joked “there’s something in the water down in Orange County, so watch out.”

Read more at OCRegister.com

 


Read More: Hannahlei Cabanilla wins ‘So You Think You Can Dance’

RDT's Season Of MANIFEST DIVERSITY Opens With The Poignant Choreography Of The Late Donald McKayle

The nation's oldest and most successful modern dance repertory company opens their 53rd season of dance in Salt Lake City with SPIRIT, October 4-6, 2018 at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center.

The centerpiece for this timely performance is Rainbow Round My Shoulder by the late Donald McKayle. Created in 1959, the acclaimed modern dance classic is a searing dramatic narrative set on a chain gang in the American south. Rainbow features seven men set as prisoners working and breaking rock from "can see to can't see." Their aspirations for freedom come in the guise of a woman, first as a vision then as a remembered sweetheart, mother, and wife. The songs that accompany their arduous labor are rich in polyphony and tell a bitter, sardonic, and tragic story.


Read More: RDT's Season Of MANIFEST DIVERSITY Opens With The Poignant Choreography Of The Late Donald McKayle

Jasmine Ejan (BA 2001) in "Cabaret" at the Celebration Theatre in Hollywood

Jasmine Ejan, BA Dance 2001, is currently playing the role of Rosie in Cabaret at the Celebration Theatre in Hollywood.


Read More: Jasmine Ejan (BA 2001) in "Cabaret" at the Celebration Theatre in Hollywood

UCI Dance Major Hannahlei Cabanilla on "So You Think You Can Dance"

Orange County dancer Hannahlei Cabanilla has a signature move that she calls an L-turn.

If you’ve caught Season 15 of the Fox series “So You Think You Can Dance” so far, then you’ve seen Cabanilla incorporate the move in her routine.

“My leg is behind my head while I’m turning on one foot,” she said, describing the L-turn that she and her longtime instructor at the Orange County Performing Arts Academy in Anaheim came up with nearly a decade ago. “I haven’t seen anyone else do that trick. It’s just my thing.”

Although it helped place her among the Top 10 for women, Cabanilla won’t be performing her signature “trick” Monday, July 23. The 18-year-old Anaheim Hills native majoring in dance at UC Irvine was paired with a “So You Think You Can Dance” all-star to learn a routine outside of her comfort zone.

“So yeah,” she said. “Obviously, it’s not going to be contemporary.”

Born and raised in Anaheim Hills as the youngest of two girls, Cabanilla
Read More: UCI Dance Major Hannahlei Cabanilla on "So You Think You Can Dance"

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