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Why Arts Administration Matters: An Interview with UCI's Molly Lynch

Dance Plug, Interview by Keira Whitaker - 20 February 2019

"As I pulled into the University of California, Irvine to park my car I couldn’t help but be transported back in time. I graduated from UCl in 2016, and poured all of myself into four years of dancing, reading, and writing. My degree was in Dance Performance and English and I’m happy to report that I get to use both of them on a daily basis. 

A part of me couldn’t help but feel nostalgic as I started walking towards the Dance Department office of the Claire Trevor School of the Arts. Another part of me was ecstatic to be interviewing the Chair of the department, Molly Lynch. She was one of my favorite professors and one of the main reasons I became a dance journalist. Professor Lynch is not only a teacher of dance, but she also specializes in arts management, business, and administration."


Read More: Why Arts Administration Matters: An Interview with UCI's Molly Lynch

From Claire Trevor To Broadway: Justin Keats’ Career After Graduation

By Lauren Knight

A few years after he graduated from UCI’s Claire Trevor School of the Arts, Justin Keats’ phone rang in an audition waiting room in New York City. Preparing to sing at an audition in four minutes for another Broadway musical, Keats saw his agent’s name on his screen and did not hesitate to answer. In the midst of rehearsing for another project and auditioning for a new Broadway show, Keats found out that he would be making his Broadway debut in Cirque du Soleil’s new Broadway show, “Paramour.” Processing all that he could over the phone as his agent laid down the logistics, he soon realized that his name would be called for the audition any minute, and hurried back into the waiting room. Finishing up his audition and bolting out of the building as soon as possible, Keats quickly grabbed lunch and two hours after the initial call, ran to his first day of rehearsals for “Paramour.”


Read More: From Claire Trevor To Broadway: Justin Keats’ Career After Graduation

At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

The “NY Quadrille” format reconfigures the Joyce Theater by turning auditorium and stage inside out. The square stage becomes the theater’s centerpiece: The audience is on both sides, as at a tennis or snooker match.

One side of the stage leads straight to a rising slope of tiered seating, with a proximity the Joyce usually lacks. But the other side ends with a sharp drop. Dancers on that side look as exposed as if on a cliff’s edge, with a gap between them and the seats.

Everything about this is so refreshing that I wish it happened more often. In 2016, when the “NY Quadrille” had its first iteration, four companies appeared in a two-week season. This year, five troupes will contribute over three weeks. The idea came from the choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who has curated both seasons.


Read More: At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

The “NY Quadrille” format reconfigures the Joyce Theater by turning auditorium and stage inside out. The square stage becomes the theater’s centerpiece: The audience is on both sides, as at a tennis or snooker match.

One side of the stage leads straight to a rising slope of tiered seating, with a proximity the Joyce usually lacks. But the other side ends with a sharp drop. Dancers on that side look as exposed as if on a cliff’s edge, with a gap between them and the seats.

Everything about this is so refreshing that I wish it happened more often. In 2016, when the “NY Quadrille” had its first iteration, four companies appeared in a two-week season. This year, five troupes will contribute over three weeks. The idea came from the choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who has curated both seasons.


Read More: At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

Fall Dance Preview: From Ballet to Bach

One of J.S. Bach’s most iconic works, the Brandenburg Concertos, will be presented as a dance at the Park Avenue Armory this fall. It is one of several new works of dance to be presented throughout New York City starting this month.

WNYC’s dance critic Marina Harss spoke to Richard Hake about the upcoming season. She highlighted this North American premiere set to the music of Bach created by Belgian choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker.

"She’s a modern dance choreographer with a strong influence of minimalism," Harss told Hake. "She’s really interested in the structures underlying the music. What she sort of does is break apart all the layers, and Bach has many layers."

Harss also discussed the dances of Kyle Abraham who is presenting his first-ever work for New York City Ballet. It will debut as part of the ballet’s Fall Gala on Sept. 27.

Abraham’s company, A.I.M., will also be on stage at the Joyce Theater as part of its three-week, dance festival
Read More: Fall Dance Preview: From Ballet to Bach

Meet the first Filipina winner of 'So You Think You Can Dance'

UCI Dance student Hannahlei Cabanilla’s audition piece alone got the “So You Think You Can Dance” judges on their feet to welcome her with a golden ticket to the academy, including Fil-Am celebrity judge Vanessa Hudgens.

Her victory is one for the books.

Hannahlei is the first Filipino-American to win the $250,000 prize as the grand winner of this season of “So You Think You Can Dance.”

“Every step of the journey is very humbling, and it’s so amazing that I’ve had an impact on so many people’s lives, and I’m representing dancers, Filipinos, just everyone’s that is supporting me.”

Her message for those who dream of becoming the next dance show winner is to put in the work.

“I just wanna inspire them and show that anyone could do this if you just put in the effort and time and work, because I was one of those little girls looking up to all the past winners, knowing that I wanted to be on this show…and now I’m in the winner’s shoes.

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Read More: Meet the first Filipina winner of 'So You Think You Can Dance'

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