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UCI Claire Trevor School of the Arts Names Samantha Lin as the 2019 Annual ASTAIREAWARDS® Scholarship and Award Recipient

UCI Claire Trevor School of the Arts Names Samantha Lin as the 2019 Annual ASTAIREAWARDS® Scholarship and Award Recipient

Irvine, Calif. – The Claire Trevor School of the Arts' department of dance, at the University of California, Irvine, is pleased to announce fourth-year dance student Samantha Lin as the  2019 ASTAIREAWARDS® Scholarship and Award recipient.  The annual ASTAIREAWARDS® scholarship is presented  to students for their excellence in dance, choreography, and music. Ms. Lin will be honored at the annual Claire Trevor School of the Arts scholarship dinner on Tuesday, June 4, 2019.

“We are very pleased to be giving the 2019 ASTAIREAWARDS® scholarship and award to Samantha for her outstanding performances, choreography and being a good artist citizen,” said Molly Lynch, chair of the department of dance. “She has excelled in our dance program.”

Ms. Lin is a double major completing her B.F.A
Read More: UCI Claire Trevor School of the Arts Names Samantha Lin as the 2019 Annual ASTAIREAWARDS® Scholarship and Award Recipient

Why Arts Administration Matters: An Interview with UCI's Molly Lynch

Dance Plug, Interview by Keira Whitaker - 20 February 2019

"As I pulled into the University of California, Irvine to park my car I couldn’t help but be transported back in time. I graduated from UCl in 2016, and poured all of myself into four years of dancing, reading, and writing. My degree was in Dance Performance and English and I’m happy to report that I get to use both of them on a daily basis. 

A part of me couldn’t help but feel nostalgic as I started walking towards the Dance Department office of the Claire Trevor School of the Arts. Another part of me was ecstatic to be interviewing the Chair of the department, Molly Lynch. She was one of my favorite professors and one of the main reasons I became a dance journalist. Professor Lynch is not only a teacher of dance, but she also specializes in arts management, business, and administration."


Read More: Why Arts Administration Matters: An Interview with UCI's Molly Lynch

From Claire Trevor To Broadway: Justin Keats’ Career After Graduation

By Lauren Knight

A few years after he graduated from UCI’s Claire Trevor School of the Arts, Justin Keats’ phone rang in an audition waiting room in New York City. Preparing to sing at an audition in four minutes for another Broadway musical, Keats saw his agent’s name on his screen and did not hesitate to answer. In the midst of rehearsing for another project and auditioning for a new Broadway show, Keats found out that he would be making his Broadway debut in Cirque du Soleil’s new Broadway show, “Paramour.” Processing all that he could over the phone as his agent laid down the logistics, he soon realized that his name would be called for the audition any minute, and hurried back into the waiting room. Finishing up his audition and bolting out of the building as soon as possible, Keats quickly grabbed lunch and two hours after the initial call, ran to his first day of rehearsals for “Paramour.”


Read More: From Claire Trevor To Broadway: Justin Keats’ Career After Graduation

At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

The “NY Quadrille” format reconfigures the Joyce Theater by turning auditorium and stage inside out. The square stage becomes the theater’s centerpiece: The audience is on both sides, as at a tennis or snooker match.

One side of the stage leads straight to a rising slope of tiered seating, with a proximity the Joyce usually lacks. But the other side ends with a sharp drop. Dancers on that side look as exposed as if on a cliff’s edge, with a gap between them and the seats.

Everything about this is so refreshing that I wish it happened more often. In 2016, when the “NY Quadrille” had its first iteration, four companies appeared in a two-week season. This year, five troupes will contribute over three weeks. The idea came from the choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who has curated both seasons.


Read More: At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

The “NY Quadrille” format reconfigures the Joyce Theater by turning auditorium and stage inside out. The square stage becomes the theater’s centerpiece: The audience is on both sides, as at a tennis or snooker match.

One side of the stage leads straight to a rising slope of tiered seating, with a proximity the Joyce usually lacks. But the other side ends with a sharp drop. Dancers on that side look as exposed as if on a cliff’s edge, with a gap between them and the seats.

Everything about this is so refreshing that I wish it happened more often. In 2016, when the “NY Quadrille” had its first iteration, four companies appeared in a two-week season. This year, five troupes will contribute over three weeks. The idea came from the choreographer Lar Lubovitch, who has curated both seasons.


Read More: At the Joyce, a Rearranged Theater Brings Mystery and Orthodoxy

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